Archive for December, 2010


here is a link to my FAVORITE ideas on science buddies.org: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/recommender_show_favorites.php?emailthis=1&isb=cmlkOjgwODQ3MTYsc2lkOjIscDoz

 

GREAT IDEAS ARE RIGHT HERE –>  http://www.cool-science-projects.com/elementaryScienceProjects.html

 

EXAMPLE SCIENCE FAIR PLANS:::::

Science fair ideas with websites:  click link –>Science Fair Websites

Test the effectiveness of Beano:     http://www.biotechinstitute.org/node/58

Extract DNA from fruit: http://www.biotechinstitute.org/node/1429

does packaging affect speed of fruit ripening?: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/MatlSci_p022.shtml

test for vitamin c: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2001/BryanT.html

alka selter dissolve rate: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2001/KaitlynS.html

what fabric burns the fastest: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2001/MarkusN.html

paper towel absorption: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2001/SamanthaP.html

temperature & mold growth

http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2000/NicholeA.html

stain remover on white cloth: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2000/CaitlinH.html

taco sauce penny cleaner: http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/the-cleaning-power-of-taco-sauce-bright-shiny-pennies

iron in cereal: http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/00000034

invincible soap bubble: http://www.all-science-fair-projects.com/project1242_150_1.html

water temperature & detergent effectiveness: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2002/RachelFl.html

air & vitamin C: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2002/AnnieM.html

dissolving rate of ibuprofin: http://www.selah.k12.wa.us/SOAR/SciProj2003/CarmelleS.html

yeast air balloon: http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/activity-yeast.html

yeast and sugar: http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/MicroBio_p011.shtml?from=Home

liver & enzymes:  http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/BioChem_p030.shtml?fave=no&isb=c2lkOjEsaWE6QmlvQ2hlbSxwOjEscmlkOjgwODQ3MTY&from=TSW

are fingerprints heritable?

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Genom_p009.shtml?fave=no&isb=c2lkOjEsaWE6R2Vub20scDoxLHJpZDo4MDg0NzE2&from=TSW

sugar substitutes & yeast

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/MicroBio_p005.shtml?fave=no&isb=c2lkOjEsaWE6TWljcm9CaW8scDoxLHJpZDo4MDg0NzE2&from=TSW

why do cut apples turn brown?

http://scienceprojectideasforkids.com/2010/browning-apple-experiment/

growing crystals

http://scienceprojectideasforkids.com/2010/borax-crystals/

vinegar & rubbery bones

http://www.sciencebob.com/experiments/rubberbone.php

best vitamin c drink

http://www.odec.ca/projects/2008/jain8k2/index.html

vitamin c TONS OF IDEAS!!!!!!    !!!!!    !!!!

http://www.juliantrubin.com/fairprojects/food/vitaminc.html

Nail Polish Ideas

http://www.madsci.org/FAQs/nail_polish.html

what colors are in smarties (and other candy too!)

http://www.madsci.org/experiments/archive/870185139.Ch.html

electric fruit (citrus, potato, carrot, pineapple)

http://www.madsci.org/experiments/archive/889917606.Ch.html

coloring flowers – rate of transpiration

http://www.madsci.org/experiments/archive/887562625.Bi.html

floating rice krispies – test different types of fabric for static electricity

http://www.madsci.org/experiments/archive/857359255.Ph.html

fastest way to melt ice?

http://www.k12.nf.ca/stbons/newsevents/20022003/sciencefair/caitlin_and_ann_marie.htm

 

 

HOW TO DO Background Research:

How to do Background Research for Science Fair

 

 

Science Fair Timeline & research criteria

science fair Research Criteria

 

GUIDED HELP FOR THE ENTIRE SCIENCE PROJECT – ALL SECTIONS CLEARLY EXPLAINED

science fair – guided help – UPLOAD

 


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Getting ordinary plastic bags to rot away like banana peels would be an environmental dream come true.

After all, we produce 500 billion a year worldwide and they take up to 1,000 years to decompose. They take up space in landfills, litter our streets and parks, pollute the oceans and kill the animals that eat them.

Now a Waterloo teenager has found a way to make plastic bags degrade faster — in three months, he figures.

Daniel Burd’s project won the top prize at the Canada-Wide Science Fair in Ottawa. He came back with a long list of awards, including a $10,000 prize, a $20,000 scholarship, and recognition that he has found a practical way to help the environment.

Daniel, a 16-year-old Grade 11 student at Waterloo Collegiate Institute, got the idea for his project from everyday life.

“Almost every week I have to do chores and when I open the closet door, I have this avalanche of plastic bags falling on top of me,” he said. “One day, I got tired of it and I wanted to know what other people are doing with these plastic bags.”

The answer: not much. So he decided to do something himself.

He knew plastic does eventually degrade, and figured microorganisms must be behind it. His goal was to isolate the microorganisms that can break down plastic — not an easy task because they don’t exist in high numbers in nature.

First, he ground plastic bags into a powder. Next, he used ordinary household chemicals, yeast and tap water to create a solution that would encourage microbe growth. To that, he added the plastic powder and dirt. Then the solution sat in a shaker at 30 degrees.

After three months of upping the concentration of plastic-eating microbes, Burd filtered out the remaining plastic powder and put his bacterial culture into three flasks with strips of plastic cut from grocery bags. As a control, he also added plastic to flasks containing boiled and therefore dead bacterial culture.

Six weeks later, he weighed the strips of plastic. The control strips were the same. But the ones that had been in the live bacterial culture weighed an average of 17 per cent less.

That wasn’t good enough for Burd. To identify the bacteria in his culture, he let them grow on agar plates and found he had four types of microbes. He tested those on more plastic strips and found only the second was capable of significant plastic degradation.

Next, Burd tried mixing his most effective strain with the others. He found strains one and two together produced a 32 per cent weight loss in his plastic strips. His theory is strain one helps strain two reproduce.

Tests to identify the strains found strain two was Sphingomonas bacteria and the helper was Pseudomonas.

A researcher in Ireland has found Pseudomonas is capable of degrading polystyrene, but as far as Burd and his teacher Mark Menhennet know — and they’ve looked — Burd’s research on polyethelene plastic bags is a first.

Next, Burd tested his strains’ effectiveness at different temperatures, concentrations and with the addition of sodium acetate as a ready source of carbon to help bacteria grow.

At 37 degrees and optimal bacterial concentration, with a bit of sodium acetate thrown in, Burd achieved 43 per cent degradation within six weeks.

The plastic he fished out then was visibly clearer and more brittle, and Burd guesses after six more weeks, it would be gone. He hasn’t tried that yet.

To see if his process would work on a larger scale, he tried it with five or six whole bags in a bucket with the bacterial culture. That worked too.

Industrial application should be easy, said Burd. “All you need is a fermenter . . . your growth medium, your microbes and your plastic bags.”

The inputs are cheap, maintaining the required temperature takes little energy because microbes produce heat as they work, and the only outputs are water and tiny levels of carbon dioxide — each microbe produces only 0.01 per cent of its own infinitesimal weight in carbon dioxide, said Burd

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(CNN) — The chemistry of the world’s oceans is changing at a rate not seen for 65 million years, with far-reaching implications for marine biodiversity and food security, according to a new United Nations study released Thursday.

“Environmental Consequences of Ocean Acidification,” published by the U.N. Environmental Program (UNEP),” warns that some sea organisms including coral and shellfish will find it increasingly difficult to survive, as acidification shrinks the minerals needed to form their skeletons.

Lead author of the report Carol Turley, from the UK’s Plymouth Marine Laboratory said in a statement: “We are seeing an overall negative impact from ocean acidification directly on organisms and on some key ecosystems that help provide food for billions. We need to start thinking about the risk to food security.”

Tropical reefs provide shelter and food for around a quarter of all known marine fish species, according to the U.N. report, while over one billion people rely on fish as a key source of protein.

Increasing acidification is likely to affect the growth and structural integrity of coral reef, the study says, and coupled with ocean warming could limit the habitats of crabs, mussels and other shellfish with knock-on effects up and down the food chain.

The report, unveiled during the latest round of U.N. climate talks in Cancun, Mexico, says that around a quarter of the world’s CO2 emissions are currently being absorbed by the oceans, where they are turned into carbonic acid.

Overall, pH levels in seas and oceans worldwide have fallen by an average of 30 percent since the Industrial Revolution. The report predicts that by the end of this century ocean acidity will have increased 150 percent, if emissions continue to rise at the current rate.

But scientists say there may well be winners and losers as acidification doesn’t affect all sea creatures in the same way.

Adult lobsters, for example, may increase their shell-building as pH levels fall, as might brittle stars — a close relation of the starfish — but at the cost of muscle formation.

“The ability, or inability, to build calcium-based skeletons may not be the only impact of acidification on the health and viability of an organism: brittle stars perhaps being a case in point,” Turley said in a statement.

“It is clearly not enough to look at a species. Scientists will need to study all parts of the life-cycle to see whether certain forms are more or less vulnerable.”

Scientists are more certain about the fate of photosynthetic organisms such as seagrasses, saying they are likely to benefit from rising acidification and that some creatures will simply adapt to the changing chemistry of the oceans.

The authors identify a range of measures which policymakers need to consider to stop pH levels falling further, including “rapid and substantial cuts” to CO2 emissions as well as assessing the vulnerability of communities which rely on marine resources.

Ocean acidification is yet another red flag being raised, carrying planetary health warnings about the uncontrolled growth in greenhouse gas emissions. It is a new and emerging piece in the scientific jigsaw puzzle, but one that is triggering rising concern.

 

coral that is in the process of dying 😦